Caren Loebel-Fried: Artist. Illustrator. Author.
Email Home Biography Gallery Links Print and Card Shop Books

Book Information:
Lono and the Magical Land Beneath the Sea

Written and illustrated by
Caren Loebel-Fried
Bishop Museum Press, 2006
Size: 9-1/4 x 10
Pages: 36
Binding: cloth

Buy it today at: www.booklineshawaii.com




Lono’s Garden Notecard Collection
Bishop Museum Press
Caren Loebel-Fried
4” x 6” – 12 notecard set

Buy it today at: www.booklineshawaii.com

Long ago, before many people inhabited this land, a fisherman named Lono lived in Keauhou, North Kona. One day, after carefully preparing his hooks and basket traps, Lono went fishing at Mauna, a fishing station near his home. He cast his fishing line, but when he pulled it in the fishhook was broken. Thinking it had gotten caught on the coral reef, Lono tried casting another line. But that fishhook was broken, too.

Join Lono, a Hawaiian fisherman, as he dives below the ocean waves to search for his missing fishhooks. Deep below the sea, at the foundation of the earth, Lono discovers an enchanted land filled with abundant food plants. Kumuhonua invites Lono to live with them in the land beneath the sea, to eat from these plants and learn about how to cultivate them for the people in his island home.

Lono the the Magical Land Beneath the Sea was adapted from Mary Kawena Pukui's translation of "Moolelo Kahiko no Kumuhonu," held in the Bishop Museum Archives. The hand-colored block print images by award winning artist Caren Loebel-Fried include botanical illustrations of the food plants. The book includes the original Hawaiian text and an afterword by Bishop Museum educator Noelle Kahanu on Lono and the Makahiki season.

This is a beautifully designed, full color notecard set featuring artwork from Loebel-Fried’s new illustrated storybook, Lono and the Magical Land Beneath the Sea. Each set includes 12 notecards and envelopes—two each of six images highlighting traditional Hawaiian food plants, like kalo, uala and ‘awa. Ethnobotanical information provided by Amy Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden is included on each card.

Critical Acclaim For
Lono and the Magical Land Beneath the Sea

2007 Ka Palapala Po`okela Book Awards:
  • EXCELLENCE IN CHILDREN'S HAWAIIAN CULTURE
  • EXCELLENCE IN CHILDREN'S LITERATURE

"Stunningly illustrated in hand-colored block prints, this tale of Lono was adapted from a translation by Mary Kawena Pukui. Lono is a fisherman on the island of Hawai'i long ago. Loebel-Fried is adept at creating a warm, intimate mood through her word choices. The story begins when Lono wakes early one morning to the sound of creaking:

'The gourd that held his hooks and lines was calling him. In the darkness, Lono yawned and quietly gathered his fishing gear. He made no noise since it could offend the gods and ruin his luck. Outside in the cool air, Lono looked at the sky. There was a glimmer of light on the horizon, but the stars still shone, and he saw that they pointed towards Mauna.'

Lono comes to discover an amazing world of plants beneath the sea that eventually transform. About the art, Loebel-Fried writes, 'The technique is similar to Hawaiian 'ohe kapala, which was practiced by highly skilled women. They decorated their kapa fabric with stamps carved from bamboo that were dipped in natural dyes and pressed into the cloth in geometric patterns.' The book concludes with an insightful afterward and a thorough list of resources."

The Honolulu Advertiser
Books with a Feel for the Islands
By Jolie Jean Cotton

Sunday, May 6, 2007

Honolulu Weekly
Summer Storytime

"A handful of new children's books free the imaginations of all ages, from tots to tutu"
By Becky Maltby
June 6, 2007

Lono and the Magical Land Beneath the Sea Adapted and Illustrated by Caren Loebel-Fried A fisherman is lured into the ocean. He meets a guy (who looks "like a god") and his daughter in a magical land. They teach him about plants kids have heard of, like taro, sweet potato, sugarcane and banana. When he returns home, the fisherman's new knowledge is the source of survival for generations to come. The book is adapted from a story translated by Mary Kawena Pukui (the Hawaiian version is included at the end), one of the many tales of the Hawaiian god Lono. Its folktale style is enhanced by the hand-colored, block print illustrations. An educational and visually appealing read.


The Honolulu Advertiser Books with a Feel for the Islands
By Jolie Jean Cotton
Sunday, May 6, 2007

"LONO AND THE MAGICAL LAND BENEATH THE SEA" BY CAREN LOEBEL-FRIED;
BISHOP MUSEUM PRESS, AGES 4-8, $14.95

Stunningly illustrated in hand-colored block prints, this tale of Lono was adapted from a translation by Mary Kawena Pukui. Lono is a fisherman on the island of Hawai'i long ago. Loebel-Fried is adept at creating a warm, intimate mood through her word choices. The story begins when Lono wakes early one morning to the sound of creaking: "The gourd that held his hooks and lines was calling him. In the darkness, Lono yawned and quietly gathered his fishing gear. He made no noise since it could offend the gods and ruin his luck. Outside in the cool air, Lono looked at the sky. There was a glimmer of light on the horizon, but the stars still shone, and he saw that they pointed towards Mauna." Lono comes to discover an amazing world of plants beneath the sea that eventually transform. About the art, Loebel-Fried writes, "The technique is similar to Hawaiian 'ohe kapala, which was practiced by highly skilled women. They decorated their kapa fabric with stamps carved from bamboo that were dipped in natural dyes and pressed into the cloth in geometric patterns." The book concludes with an insightful afterward and a thorough list of resources.


Honolulu Star Bulletin
May 22, 2007

Bishop Museum Press was the big winner in the 2007 Ka Palapala Po'okela book awards, picking up four awards and one honorable mention. The winners were announced Friday evening at a ceremony held at McCoy Pavilion at Ala Moana Beach Park, coinciding with the opening of the second annual Hawaii Book and Music Festival. This marks the 14th year for the awards, which are presented by the Hawaii Book Publishers Association to recognize the finest books published during the previous year and to honor individuals involved in their creation. The number of entries continued to reflect the strength of the local book-publishing industry, with a total of 105 nominations from 73 separate book projects entered in a newly shortened slate of 124 categories. These were narrowed down to two certificate awards given in each category, as determined by the votes of the Hawaii Book Academy, a group that includes librarians, booksellers, educators, publishing and media professionals, and other dedicated book lovers.


EXCELLENCE IN CHILDREN'S HAWAIIAN CULTURE
"Lono and the Magical Land Beneath the Sea" by Caren Loebel-Fried (Bishop Museum Press)
CHILDREN'S LITERATURE
Honolulu Advertiser Friday, March 23, 2007

ISLAND LIFE SHORTS GIFT IDEA LONO LORE FOR YOUR LETTERS It's nice to have blank notecards handy for that random "thinking of you" to friends and family. Bishop Museum Press' new Lono's Garden ($9.95) boxed set of cards featuring bold artwork by Caren Loebel-Fried are visually luscious and educational, including notes on the god Lono, kalo, mai'a (bananas), and ko (sugar cane). Available at Bishop Museum and Na Mea/Native Books at Ward Warehouse.


Hawai`i Tribune Herald
Lesa Griffith
February 14, 2007

Bishop Book on Lono Bishop Press announces that its new releases include a children's book on the Hawaiian agriculture god Lono, an adult book of historic surfing photos and boxed notecard sets featuring images from both books. Proceeds of the sales of these items support Bishop Museum programs and activities. The books and notecards are currently available at Bishop Museum's Shop Pacifica, and other bookstores and retail outlets throughout Hawaii. "Lono and the Magical Land Beneath the Sea" is adapted and illustrated by Caren Loebel-Fried from Mary Kawena Pukui's translation of "Moolelo Kahiko no Kumuhonua" held in the Bishop Museum Archives. The story is one of many tales of Lono, a Hawaiian god of peace, growth, rain, fertility, agriculture, and healing. Lono's annual return is marked by the rise of the constellation Makali'i and lasts for four months. During this time known as Makahiki, Lono presides over elaborate rituals and joyous celebrations, ushering in the new year and a peaceful reign when all work and warfare ceases. The note cards contain ethnobotanical information provided by Noa Lincoln, an educator from the Amy B. H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Gardenin Kona.


All artwork and text on these pages Copyright © 2002-2014 Caren Loebel-Fried. All rights reserved.
Web design by ZLF Web Solutions